Protecting Yourself from Uninsured Motorists

In 49 out of 50 states, all registered drivers are required to carry minimum amounts of car insurance. If you are in one of them, then you could face penalties if you get caught driving uninsured.

Just because you obey the law, doesn’t mean others will. And, if you get into an accident with an uninsured driver, then they might not be able to provide the compensation to which you might be entitled. However, if your own auto insurance includes the appropriate coverage—uninsured motorist benefits—then you will have a solution at hand. Here’ why it’s important to look into this critical piece of coverage as essential to your security behind the wheel.

What is uninsured motorist coverage?

Many states have an at-fault insurance system, which means that drivers who are at fault for wrecks must pay for their own damage and the damage they cause to others. To pay for third-party damage, you will have to use auto liability insurance. As a result, this coverage is mandatory in most states.

However, in the event that another driver is at-fault for a wreck, but doesn’t have liability insurance, then you won’t have a way to claim your own damage against their policy. However, by carrying the added benefit of uninsured motorist coverage on your own plan, you will have a place to turn for your own benefits. This benefit will allow you to make a claim on your own damage and injuries on your own plan, but you won’t have the disadvantage of being labeled an at-fault driver.

Why do I need this benefit?

You can only buy your own auto insurance; you can’t buy it for the driver in the car next to you. As a result, you never know what auto insurance they are carrying, or if they even have it. As a result, it’s best to take responsibility for yourself by enhancing your policy with uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.

If you get hit by an uninsured motorist, of if you become the victim of a hit-and-run accident, then you will have no way to claim your own damage against the driver’s liability insurance. So, if someone hits your car, causes $15,000 worth of damage, and flees the scene, your uninsured motorist coverage will kick in and cover the damages, instead of you having to pay out of pocket.

By turning to your uninsured motorist coverage, you’ll be able to file for coverage for both the damage caused by the collision and the injuries you might have sustained. Therefore, your personal financial loss for these accidents will likely be lower than it would be if you lacked coverage.

A further benefit to carry alongside uninsured motorist coverage is underinsured motorist coverage. This coverage can come into play if the at-fault driver has liability insurance, but doesn’t have enough to cover 100% of your damage costs. Therefore, after your claim exceeds that person’s liability limits, you can file against your own underinsured motorist coverage for the additional benefits.